Austerity, Adversity, Art?

Fine Art education as a site of social and political resistance, initiative and engagement

Friday, 23 March 2018 (All day)

Event Institution: 

National Association for Fine Art Education

Event Partner: 

Wolverhampton University

Callout Link: 

Call Out

Tags:
Annual Conference
AGM

Booking website:

Event Booking Name: 

Andrew Sheridan

Event Email:

admin@nafae.org.uk

Free to NAFAE members

Event Address: 

Wolverhampton University
Molineux Street
Wolverhampton
WV1 1DT
United Kingdom

Venue Google Map: 

Click to view on Google Maps

Event Contact Name: 

Andrew Sheridan

Event Email:

admin@nafae.org.uk

Links:

  • Introduction

    Austerity, Adversity, Art?
    Fine Art education as a site of social and political resistance, initiative and engagement

    NAFAE's annual symposium and AGM is a selection of pecha-kucha style short provocations, poster presentations, and 20 minute papers/case studies.

    As a network we are primarily interested in practice and projects; in how people are producing and how educators and fine art practitioners are responding to challenge.

    These contributions address:

    Contexts – challenges for or outcomes from Fine Art Education
    Responses – what are you doing now?
    Proposals – what should we be doing?

    Positive inventions that have significant value. The role of Fine Art and cultural activism at times of specific deprivation. Examples of partnerships beyond the sector. Activism and counter-practices. Impacts from austerity and alternative economies. A future with or without Europe. Teaching craft and making. Emerging skills. Skills preparating future graduates. Teaching beginners and those without prior foundations in Art and Design. Supporting poverty in the student body. Countering adversity. Art education as resistance. Managing commercial priorities and an instrumentalised education sector.

    Conference date: 23rd March 2018

    Hosted jointly by NAFAE and Wolverhampton University.

  • Schedule

    Friday 23 March: AGM & Conference

    9.30 am
    Annual General Meeting
    9.30 – 10.00 am
    Registration & Coffee Diaspora Show
    Wolverhampton Art Gallery
    10.00 am
    Introductory Papers Introduction Maggie Ayliffe
    10.10 - 10.30
    State of Exception: Art Schools in time of Austerity
    Christian Mieves, University of Wolverhampton
    Presentation
     
    The Precarious University’ – Co-Production as Interstitial Resistance
    @.ac
    Petcha-Kucha

    10.30 – 10.50
    Rebel Rebel, How could they know? Hot Tramp, I love you so! or Recognising Experience-based Education and Learning
    Marsha Bradfield and Kerri Jefferis, University of the Arts London
    Presentation
     
    Prefab
    Martin Fowler, University of Cumbria Carlisle
    Petcha-Kucha

    10.50 – 11.10
    Inventing a world that works between the land and the Globe
    Harry Meadows, University of Bournemouth
    Presentation
     
    Precarious practices, precarious futures
    Adam Cooke & Paul Jones, Wrexham Glyndwr University
    Petcha-Kucha

    12.00 – 1.00 Lunch at the Art School


    1.00 – 2.00 Afternoon Session

    1.00 – 2.00
    Courting Resistance
    Professor Juan Cruz, Dr Chantal Faust, RCA
    Presentation
     
    Overlapping species of spaces: exploiting ecotones in an urban setting and various attempts at increasing artistic biodiversity
    Alec Shepley & Paul Jones, Wrexham Glyndŵr University
    Petcha-Kucha

    1.40
    Between Hands – Painting as a Negotiated Space
    John McClenaghen Wrexham Glyndwr University & Christopher McHugh, University of Chichester
    Presentation
     
    The Gift Economy
    Gavin Rogers & Laura Onions, University of Wolverhampton
    Petcha-Kucha

    2.00 – 3.00 Afternoon Breakout Sessions

    Strand 1
    Strategies for Teaching Sculpture: The Economies of Material Production
    Paula Chambers, Leeds Arts University
    Presentation
     
    The Arts of Foresight, Technology and Dragons: an inquiry into new narratives
    Professor David Haley, University of Technology, Dr Vincent Walsh, Liverpool John Moores University
    Presentation
     
    Strand 2
    Hysteria, Betrayal and Art
    Dr Catherine Maffioletti & Dr Chrysanthi Nigianni
    Presentation
     
    ‘La Police s'affiche aux Beaux Arts’ : 1968 - The Art School as Symbolic Opposition.
    Richard Hudson-Miles, Kingston University
    Presentation
     
    Strand 3
    What makes an art school work?
    Wolverhampton School of Art tour and Workshop

    3.00 – 3.15 Break

    3.15 – 4.00
    Should we be tendentious or is it more or less or other than that?
    Jenny Walden University of Portsmouth
    Presentation
     
    Effectual Action, Cultural Empowerment, Mobility and the Art School
    Eliza Bonham-Carter & Paul Haywood
    Round Table Discussion

    4.30
    Close

    Poster
    Dynamic Peer Learning (A discourse analysis of the Fine Art Crit)
    Ella McCartney, Manchester Metropolitan University, Fiona Lake Ph. D candidate, School of English, University of Nottingham.
  • Getting there

    Location

    Morning session:

    Wolverhampton City art gallery.
    The current exhibition is Diaspora Pavilion: Venice to Wolverhampton. Lichfield St.
    Wolverhampton
    West Midlands
    WV1 1DU

    Lunch & Afternoon session:

    George Wallis (MK) building
    Molineux Street
    City Campus North
    WV1 1DT

    Download a campus map
    Download a map of Wolverhampton

    The morning sessions are all in the Wolverhampton City Art Gallery (TBC), which you can find under Places of interest on the interactive map.
    The afternoon sessions are a 10 minute walk away the other side of the main road in the George Wallis (MK) building, under Buildings on the same interactive map.


    Accommodation

    Nearby there is: a Premiere Inn; the Britannia, a more traditional hotel; Novatel; and the Red Wings Lodge.

    You can download the map here:
    City Campus Molineux


    Getting There by road

    Junction 10 of the M6 is the nearest motorway junction. The University is split into two sites - City Campus North and South - both of which are signposted from the Ring Road and the A449.


    Parking

    Although there is only very limited metered parking by the main reception on Wulfruna Street, there are a number of public pay car parks within walking distance.
    Of these, the Civic Centre car park, at the end of Wulfruna Street, or the long-term car park off Whitmore/Broad Street are the closest.


    Getting there by public Transport

    Walking from the station

    The City Campus is right in the centre of Wolverhampton. It is a seven-minute walk from both the train station and St Georges Metro terminus, and a five-minute walk from the main bus station.

    • From the train station - as you exit walk straight ahead and veer right across the road bridge going over the ring road.
    • From the bus station - walk stratight ahead as you exit, past WH Smiths on your left and continue to the crossroads.
    • At the cross roads continue straight ahead down Lichfield Street, you will see the Britannia hotel and The Grand Theatre on your left as you continue down the road.
    • At the next junction where you reach Indi bar and the Royal London Buildings turn right – you will see The George in front of you. This is the beginning of the 'University Quarter'
    • From the Metro - upon exiting the Metro station, walk towards Primark, cross the road and then take a right alongside Marks and Spencers
    • Continue along this road - it will bend slightly to the right and then back to the left. Keep going until you reach a crossroads - you will have Indi Bar on your left.
    • Cross over and continue on the same direction around the Royal London Buildings. You should now see The George in front of you.
  • Call Out

    CALL FOR PAPERS

    NAFAE is inviting proposals for provocations and contributions for their up-coming annual symposium.
    Please submit up to 200 word abstracts by 29th January 2018 for either: pecha-kucha style short provocations, poster presentations, or 20 minute papers/case studies.

    Austerity, Adversity, Art?
    Fine Art education as a site of social and political resistance, initiative and engagement

    As a network we are primarily interested in practice and projects; in how people are producing and how educators and fine art practitioners are responding to challenge.

    We are looking for papers and contributions that address:

    Contexts – challenges for or outcomes from Fine Art Education
    Responses – what are you doing now?
    Proposals – what should we be doing?

    Positive inventions that have significant value. The role of Fine Art and cultural activism at times of specific deprivation. Examples of partnerships beyond the sector. Activism and counter-practices. Impacts from austerity and alternative economies. A future with or without Europe. Teaching craft and making. Emerging skills. Skills preparating future graduates. Teaching beginners and those without prior foundations in Art and Design. Supporting poverty in the student body. Countering adversity. Art education as resistance. Managing commercial priorities and an instrumentalised education sector.

    Please include your name, email address and institution or status, along with the title of the proposed contribution and any technical details such as duration and format

    Deadline for proposals: 29th January 2018
    Conference date: 23rd March 2018
    Send abstracts to: admin@nafae.org.uk

    Hosted jointly by NAFAE and Wolverhampton University.


Event Map Location: 

Event Papers: 

Presentation Papers: 

State of Exception: Art Schools in time of Austerity
Christian Mieves
Presentation
PDF icon Abstract [72kb]
PDF icon Biography [30kb]

Rebel Rebel, How could they know? Hot Tramp, I love you so! or; Recognising Experience-based Education and Learning
Marsha Bradfield and Kerri Jefferis
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Abstract [26kb]
PDF icon Biography [51kb]

Inventing a world that works between the land and the Globe
Harry Meadows, University of Bournemouth
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Abstract [76kb]
PDF icon Biography [38kb]

Precarious practices, precarious futures
Adam Cooke & Paul Jones, Wrexham Glyndwr University
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Abstract [42kb]
PDF icon Biography [44kb]

Courting Resistance
Professor Juan Cruz, Dr Chantal Faust, RCA
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Paper
PDF icon Abstract
PDF icon Chantel Faust c.v. [76kb]
PDF icon Juan Cruz c.v. [191kb]

Overlapping species of spaces: exploiting ecotones in an urban setting and various attempts at increasing artistic biodiversity
Alec Shepley & Paul Jones, Wrexham Glyndŵr University
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Abstract [48kb]

Between Hands – Painting as a Negotiated Space
John McClenaghen Wrexham Glyndwr University & Christopher McHugh, University of Chichester
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Abstract [90kb]
PDF icon Biography [23kb]

Strategies for Teaching Sculpture: The Economies of Material Production
Paula Chambers, Leeds Arts University
Strand 1  :
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Absract [33kb]
PDF icon Biography [33kb]

Hysteria, Betrayal and Art
Dr Catherine Maffioletti & Dr Chrysanthi Nigianni
Strand 2  :
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Abstract [58kb]
PDF icon Maffioletti Biography [22kb]
PDF icon Nigianni Biography [51kb]

‘La Police s'affiche aux Beaux Arts’ : 1968 - The Art School as Symbolic Opposition.
Richard Hudson-Miles, Kingston University
Strand 2  :
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Abstract [163kb]

The Arts of Foresight, Technology and Dragons: an inquiry into new narratives
Professor David Haley, University of Technology, Dr Vincent Walsh, Liverpool John Moores University
Strand 1  :
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Abstract [25kb]

Should we be tendentious or is it more or less or other than that?
Jenny Walden, University of Portsmouth
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Abstract [45kb]
PDF icon Biography [54kb]

Effectual Action, Cultural Empowerment, Mobility and the Art School
Eliza Bonham-Carter & Paul Haywood
Round Table Discussion
PDF icon Abstract [50kb]

The Precarious University’ – Co-Production as Interstitial Resistance
@.ac
Petcha-Kucha
PDF icon Presentation
PDF icon Abstract [43kb]
PDF icon Biographies [83kb]

Poster Dynamic Peer Learning (A discourse analysis of the Fine Art Crit)
Ella McCartney, Manchester Metropolitan University, Fiona Lake Ph. D candidate, School of English, University of Nottingham.
Poster
PDF icon Abstract []35kb
PDF icon Biographies [86kb]

The Art School as Gift Economy
Laura Onions & Gavin Rogers, University of Wolverhampton
Afternoon
PDF icon Abstract [46kb]
PDF icon Biographies [20kb]

Closing remarks

500 = 10 X 10 X 5

I like systems; regularity, order, solidity, solidarity, form and unity.
Foundations to support the construction of my thoughts and beliefs.
Then I can deviate and create difference or differently create.
Sensible foundations give us permission to breathe out of rhythm.
To see around corners or from behind doors and walls.
To resist resolution and know that there is always more.
Pragmatically, personal invention and adventure requires a degree of certainty.
A sense of the earth beneath our feet, of belonging.
Creative freedoms are most sincere when rooted in secured footings.
To be of society, each cultural contribution must have value. 

I choose to respond to one pressing and paradoxical dilemma.
It concerns our general assumption of civic and equal rights.
A squandered democratic vision in an era of privileged participation.
A notional concept of public good polluted by principled sovereignty.
An aspiration that remains elusive and ill-fitting within capitalism.
Despite the packaging, our cultural democratic processes are uncommonly private.
Comprehensive access to public resources are constantly pirated for profit.
Despite our humanity, despite our protestations, we preserve selective privilege.
There is no democracy without fair access to cultural resources.
Without means of nurturing personal wisdom, knowledge, and cultural production.

This is a contemporary dilemma and challenge with serious history.
A chronic condition with ancient linage and new century character.
How to orientate the disorientated, the displaced, and the disavowed.
What does inclusion mean in a caste world promoting exclusivity.
Those who cannot access nutrition, may not grow towards illumination.
And this source of disadvantage is the genesis of privilege.
Where we become separated, we also become remote and detached.
Producing some with too little and some with too much.
And so, society becomes and remains unbalanced, unequal and unjust.
Whilst some cultural contributions become devalued and then not recognised.

Creativity is common; it is as innate as the air.
Cultural production is a normal human function, habit and need.
It is not a privilege, neither an exclusive natural gift.
It is our personal right of reply constructed from within.
Let’s not preserve a conservative model of public resource distribution.
Let’s foster optimism and build towards improving mutuality and respect.
Guarantee the means of cultural production for all in society.
Guarantee the free movement of culture between and beyond communities.
Assume an ambition for equality, enjoy the ecology of difference?
Nurture belonging for all across society and harvest rhizomatic diversity.

The trouble with today is that fear is actual currency.
The powerful play with our anxieties and profit from division.
Potential impacts from the ridiculously named Brexit are provoking uncertainty. Negotiating new terms with European nations and nationals assumes enmity.
Confused and confusing national policy initiatives divert the expert eye.
The post-truth political era is recasting democrats into ideologues.
Trumps’ narcissism is enforcing a collective state of not knowing.
Partisanship and conflicts disrupt our cosmopolitan local and global communities.
Diminished and diminishing civic ownership is segregating our social communities.
Artistic thinking for society has to combat power and privilege.

Paul Haywood, co-chair NAFAE

Steering Group Event: 

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